Fifteen year olds are not only able to buy over-the-counter dietary supplements from a sampling of health food stores across the country, the staff at those stores actually went so far as to recommend certain products, despite labels reading 'for adult use only.'
Labeling healthy foods with smiley faces and offering small prizes for buying nutritious items may be a low-cost way to get students to make healthy choices in the school lunch line, according to a new study.
About one in 14 toddlers diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder no longer met the diagnostic criteria in elementary school, but most continued to have emotional/behavior symptoms and required special education supports, according to a new study.
Parents sound off on mobile device use by children [Sun, 26 Apr 2015 11:05:03 EDT]
Smartphones and tablets have become part of everyday life, but parents still worry that mobile devices may not be the best thing for their children, according to a new study.
Program puts a dent in summer hunger [Sun, 26 Apr 2015 11:05:01 EDT]
When schools close their doors for the summer, many low-income children who rely on subsidized breakfasts and lunches don't know when they will get their next meal. An innovative program to fill this gap could serve as a model for communities looking to help feed struggling families when school is out.
Teens no longer smoke just cigarettes. They have branched out to using alternative tobacco products such as electronic cigarettes, hookahs and little cigars. In fact, e-cigarette use is rising rapidly among both cigarette smokers and nonsmokers, according to a new study.
Since it's nearly impossible to keep mobile devices out of the hands of children, they might as well learn something worthwhile using these devices. That was the idea behind the development of a game app to teach youngsters about bicycle and dog bite safety.
Adults can have a bigger influence on youths growing up in poor, violent neighborhoods than they may realize.
Kindergartners and first-graders who watched as little as one hour of television a day were more likely to be overweight or obese compared to children who watched TV for less than 60 minutes each day, according to a new study.
The use of a pocket-sized ultrasound device (PUD) helps to reduce the need for further testing in both the inpatient and outpatient setting.
The apparent dearth of research on hepatitis B and C testing in many European countries could be hampering efforts to identify infected individuals, according to results from a comprehensive review of 136 studies presented today at The International Liver CongressTM 2015.
According to the World Health Organization, excessive alcohol drinking is the most common cause of cirrhosis worldwide. A new worldwide study has shown the significant influence of daily drinking on this disease burden.
New results show that the sofosbuvir (SOF)/daclatasvir (DCV) treatment combination is effective amongst hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype-1 mono-infected patients. These results are significant because whilst other combinations have been widely reported on, there have been few data until now regarding the use of SOF/DCV combination in real world situations.
Scientists show that alcohol use disorders (AUD) have a serious, negative prognostic outcome with higher mortality risks in the general population and patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in particular.
New results demonstrate that hepatitis C (HCV)-infected genotype-3 (GT-3) patients, with and without cirrhosis, receiving 24 weeks of sofosbuvir (SOF) in combination with ribavirin (RBV) and peginterferon (PEG) achieved the highest sustained virologic response rates at 12 weeks (SVR12), observed in a Phase 3 study, to date.
State laws banning texting while driving led to significant reductions in the number of teens using their cell phones while behind the wheel, but nearly one-third still admitted to engaging in this risky behavior, according to new research.
Parents who take their kids to the playground may be tempted to pull out their cell phone to send a quick text or check Facebook. It may be more prudent, however, to stay focused on their child to ensure he or she plays safely. More than 200,000 children ages 14 and younger are treated in U.S. emergency rooms each year for playground-related injuries.
A new study shows that giving students books at the end of the school year can help stem losses in reading skills.
Babies as young as six months using mobile media [Sat, 25 Apr 2015 21:56:21 EDT]
More than one-third of babies are tapping on smartphones and tablets even before they learn to walk or talk, and by one year of age, one in seven toddlers is using devices for at least an hour a day, according to a new study.
There is evidence that reading to young children is in fact associated with differences in brain activity supporting early reading skills.
Images of infants sleeping in unsafe environments are pervasive in women's magazines and on stock photo websites, which could create confusion among parents and put babies at risk, according to a new study.
Studies have shown that patients who undergo surgeries on weekends tend to experience longer hospital stays and higher mortality rates and readmissions. For the first time, a new study has identified five resources that can help hospitals overcome this 'weekend effect': increased nurse-to-bed ratio; full adoption of electronic medical records; inpatient physical rehabilitation; a home-health program; and a pain management program.
Women who have early stage endometrial cancer and are inoperable tend to live longer if they have been treated with brachytherapy with or without external beam radiation, according to new research.
Researchers have found that increasing the dose of radiotherapy given to children with an intracranial ependymoma, a form of cancer of the central nervous system, can significantly improve their survival.
A drug from a parasitic mushroom that lives on caterpillars could become an effective new painkiller for people with osteoarthritis within the next six years.
Most psychiatric disorders -- including depression -- do not predict future violent behavior, reports a new longitudinal study of delinquent youth. The only exception is substance abuse and dependence.
Scientists develop first liquid nanolaser [Fri, 24 Apr 2015 21:31:56 EDT]
Scientists have developed the first liquid nanoscale laser. And it's tunable in real time, meaning you can quickly and simply produce different colors, a unique and useful feature. The laser technology could lead to practical applications, such as a new form of a 'lab on a chip' for medical diagnostics. In addition to changing color in real time, the liquid nanolaser has additional advantages: it is simple to make, inexpensive to produce and operates at room temperature.
Team develops faster, higher quality 3-D camera [Fri, 24 Apr 2015 21:31:52 EDT]
Inspired by the Microsoft Kinect and the human eye, scientists have developed an inexpensive 3-D camera that can be used in any environment to produce high-quality images.
The first large international study to investigate the late side-effects of a combination of two forms of brachytherapy to treat cervical cancer has shown that the technique successfully delivers higher radiation doses to the tumor without an increase in treatment-related problems afterwards. New research suggests that the technique should be the 'benchmark' for treatment of the disease.
Cerium is a widely available and inexpensive rare-earth metal. Scientists have used it to create a high-performance magnet that's similar in performance to traditional dysprosium-containing magnets and could make wind turbines less expensive to manufacture.
Children with hemophilia A require three to four infusions each week to prevent bleeding episodes, chronic pain and joint damage. A new, extended therapy combines recombinant factor VIII with a fusion protein that allows the molecule to remain in the circulation longer -- translating into a need for less frequent treatment.
A medication commonly taken for Type II diabetes, which is being found in freshwater systems worldwide, has been shown to cause intersex in fish – male fish that produce eggs. The medication is found to be widespread in freshwater.
Direct visualization of magnetoelectric domains [Fri, 24 Apr 2015 14:17:51 EDT]
Using a novel microscopy technique, scientists revealed a major enhancement of coupling between electric and magnetic dipoles. The discovery could lead to devices for use in computer memory or magnetic sensors.
Scientists have new data on Ethiopia's Rift Valley and Aluto volcano, a major volcano in the region. Aluto is Ethiopia's main source of geothermal energy, a low-carbon resource that is expected to grow considerably in the near future. Preexisting volcanic and tectonic structures have played a key role in the development of the Aluto volcanic complex and continue to facilitate the expulsion of gases and geothermal fluids.
Researchers have developed a novel technique to precisely track the 3-D positions of optically-trapped particles having complicated geometry in high speed.
Chinese scientists say they've genetically modified human embryos for the very first time. The team attempted to modify the gene responsible for beta-thalassaemia, a potentially fatal blood disorder, using a gene-editing technique known as CRISPR/Cas9. Gene editing is a recently developed type of genetic engineering in which DNA is inserted, replaced, or removed. Here, experts weigh-in with ethical questions and considerations.
Fragile X syndrome, an inherited cause of autism and intellectual disability, can have consequences even for carriers of the disorder who don't have full-blown symptoms.
Researchers have shown that a laser-generated microplasma in air can be used as a source of broadband terahertz radiation. They demonstrate that an approach for generating terahertz waves using intense laser pulses in air can be done with much lower power lasers, a major challenge until now. They have exploited the underlying physics to reduce the necessary laser power for plasma generation.
We think better on our feet, literally [Fri, 24 Apr 2015 12:11:18 EDT]
A new study finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. Preliminary results show 12 percent greater on-task engagement in classrooms with standing desks.
Gardeners know what not to do when pruning crape myrtles, but the frequent reminders against crape murder can leave some gardeners wondering if it's possible to prune these plants at all.
The recent Great Recession was accompanied by a significant and sustained increase in major depression in US adults, according to a new study.
From mobile phones and computers to television, cinema and wearable devices, the display of full-color, wide-angle, 3-D holographic images is moving ever closer to fruition.
This map provides a picture of the nation's geologic basement. More than 80 pieces of crust have been added to the nation's basement since the Earth began preserving crust about 3.6 billion years ago.
Celiac disease is one of the most common life-long conditions in Europe, yet many people remain undiagnosed and lengthy diagnostic delays may be putting lives at risk. Today, doctors are being urged to consider testing for celiac disease in anyone showing signs and symptoms of the condition and to consider screening everyone in high-risk groups.
New light shed on brain's source of power [Fri, 24 Apr 2015 10:53:52 EDT]
New research represents a potentially fundamental shift in our understanding of how nerve cells in the brain generate the energy needed to function. The study shows neurons are more independent than previously believed and this research has implications for a range of neurological disorders.
Psychology of the appeal of being anti-GMO [Fri, 24 Apr 2015 10:53:48 EDT]
A team of philosophers and plant biotechnologists have turned to cognitive science to explain why opposition to genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has become so widespread, despite positive contributions GM crops have made to sustainable agriculture. They argue that the human mind is highly susceptible to the negative and often emotional representations put out by certain environmental groups and other opponents of GMOs.
A 'pass the message' experiment investigates how people perceive and communicate the risks of a widely used chemical.
Bees play a key role in our ecosystem and in the world’s food supply. Thanks to a large collaborative effort, the genomes of two important pollinating bumblebees have been sequenced and compared with those of other bees, laying the foundations for the identification of biological factors essential for their conservation.
New insight into how brain makes memories [Fri, 24 Apr 2015 10:50:12 EDT]
Researchers have identified the role that a key protein associated with autism and the co-occurrence of alcohol dependency and depression plays in forming the spines that create new connections in the brain.
Results from a large population-based cohort of almost a million people in the UK found that the chances of dying from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, over a 14-year period, was approximately 50 percent higher than for those with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
Findings on a novel therapeutic candidate for a genomically defined subset of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with an aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) pathway have been presented. BLU-554, a small molecule inhibitor of FGFR4, has been identified as a potential treatment option for up to 30 percent of HCC patients.
New results show that cancer rates in patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) were significantly increased compared to the non-HCV cohort. The researchers suggest an extrahepatic manifestation of HCV may be an increased risk of cancer.
Biodiversity promotes multitasking in ecosystems [Fri, 24 Apr 2015 08:56:39 EDT]
A worldwide study of the interplay between organisms and their environment bolsters the idea that greater biodiversity helps maintain more stable and productive ecosystems.
Scientists have discover that certain cell structures, the centrioles, could act as information carriers throughout cell generations. The discovery raises the possibility that transmission of biological information could involve more than just genes. Centrioles may actually be carriers of information, which holds profound implications for biology and disease treatment.
Physicists have shown how heat can be exploited for controlling magnetic properties of matter. The finding helps in the development of more efficient mass memories.
Researchers have discovered that the signalling route - a cascade activation of several molecules - triggered by the ATM protein regulates DNA repair during the production of spermatocytes by meiosis, the cell division process which yields spermatozoa.
A long-standing puzzle regarding the nature of disk galaxies has finally been solved by a team of astronomers using state-of-the-art theoretical models. The new study shows that groups of stars with the same age always flare as the result of massive galactic collisions. When taken all together, these flares, nested like the petals of a blooming rose, puff up the disk and constitute what astronomers call the “thick” disk.
Gigantic volumes of hot material rising from the deep earth's mantle to the base of the lithosphere have shaped the face of our planet. Provided they have a sufficient volume, they can lead to break-up of continents or cause mass extinction events in certain periods of the Earth's history. So far it was assumed that because of their high temperatures those bodies -- called mantle plumes -- ascend directly from the bottom of the earth's mantle to the lithosphere. Scientists explain possible barriers for the ascent of these mantle plumes and under which conditions the hot material can still reach the surface. In addition, the researchers resolve major conflicts surrounding present model predictions.
Giant cosmic tsunami wakes up comatose galaxies [Fri, 24 Apr 2015 08:50:03 EDT]
Galaxies are often found in clusters, which contain many 'red and dead' members that stopped forming stars in the distant past. Now an international team of astronomers have discovered that these comatose galaxies can sometimes come back to life. If clusters of galaxies merge, a huge shock wave can drive the birth of a new generation of stars -- the sleeping galaxies get a new lease of life.
Scientists are a step closer to developing new therapies for controlling the body's response to allergies and parasitic worm infections.
Why Ringing in the Ears May Be Hard to Treat [Sat, 25 Apr 2015 00:00:00 PDT]
Title: Why Ringing in the Ears May Be Hard to Treat
Category: Health News
Created: 4/23/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/24/2015 12:00:00 AM
Title: Many Breast Cancer Patients Still Opt for Mastectomy Over Lump Removal
Category: Health News
Created: 4/23/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/24/2015 12:00:00 AM
Aha! The Power of the Moment of Realization [Tue, 21 Apr 2015 11:17:33 +0000]
Photo by Scott Cresswell - http://flic.kr/p/onFeAB

It's not so much the seeing as the doing that usually creates the most powerful "aha!" moments in our lives.

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Photo by Annelieke B - http://flic.kr/p/ft54PM

For all its many benefits, the experience of therapy can also be traumatic; sometimes, that's hard to see until it's already too late.

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Designed to cover half the surface area of a pack, new proposed labels are meant to vividly remind smokers of tobacco’s dangers.
Caregivers of veterans report greater difficulties than do those of other disabled adults.
Title: phentermine and topiramate extended-release (Qsymia)
Category: Medications
Created: 2/23/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 2/23/2015 12:00:00 AM
liraglutide injection (Saxenda) [Thu, 19 Feb 2015 00:00:00 PDT]
Title: liraglutide injection (Saxenda)
Category: Medications
Created: 2/19/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 2/19/2015 12:00:00 AM
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